Artículos de interés

School-based Brain Training Shown to Alleviate ADHD

Source: bostonglobe.com By Deborah Kotz February 17, 2014

 

With more than one in 10 children diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, parents and doctors alike have been eager to find alternatives to prescription stimulant medications like Ritalin or Adderall. Some of these options include computer programs that train the brain to increase attention span and a therapy called neurofeedback where a practitioner teaches children how to keep their brain calm and focused.

Read Article on Brain Training & ADHD

Deborah Kotz can be reached at dkotz@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @debkotz2.

Leer +

Train The Brain: Using Neurofeedback To Treat ADHD

Source: npr.org by Jon Hamilton

Katherine Ellison's son was 12 when he was diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD.

 

Katherine Ellison and her son, whom she refers to as "Buzz" in her book, both have ADHD.

Katherine Ellison and her son, whom she refers to as "Buzz" in her book, both have ADHD. Buzz was diagnosed at age 12.

Courtesy of Katherine Ellison

"He was getting into fights. He wasn't doing his homework. He was being very difficult with his little brother. And he was just melting down day after day," Ellison says. "So I decided to devote a year to trying out different approaches to see if we could make it any better."

Leer +

Katherine Ellison and her son, whom she refers to as "Buzz" in her book, both have ADHD. Buzz was diagnosed at age 12.

Courtesy of Katherine Ellison

Neurofeedback Gains Popularity and Lab Attention

By KATHERINE ELLISONOCT. 4, 2010

You sit in a chair, facing a computer screen, while a clinician sticks electrodes to your scalp with a viscous goop that takes days to wash out of your hair. Wires from the sensors connect to a computer programmed to respond to your brain’s activity.

 

Try to relax and focus. If your brain behaves as desired, you’ll be encouraged with soothing sounds and visual treats, like images of exploding stars or a flowering field. If not, you’ll get silence, a darkening screen and wilting flora.

 

This is neurofeedback, a kind of biofeedback for the brain, which practitioners say can address a host of neurological ills — among them attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism, depression and anxiety — by allowing patients to alter their own brain waves through practice and repetition.

Leer +

BRAIN TRAINING Practitioners say neurofeedback allows patients to alter their brain waves through practice.

Credit Todd Heisler/The New York Times

Biofeedback Now Seen as "Regular" Medicine

Source: Yahoo.com - by Dennis Thompson, HealthDay Reporter

Biofeedback used to be thought of as alternative therapy - something that might help but wasn't considered a fully legitimized medical treatment. No more. U.S. soldiers returning from war now use biofeedback to help deal with post-traumatic stress disorder. People suffering from chronic pain often find relief in biofeedback. Even athletes are using biofeedback to gain better control over their bodies.

Leer +

Copyright © 2010 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

First direct evidence of neuroplastic changes following brainwave training

Source: ScienceDailyMarch 12, 2010

Significant changes in brain plasticity have been observed following alpha brainwave training. "The novel finding may have important implications for future non-pharmacological therapies of the brain and calls for a serious re-examination and stronger backing of research on neurofeedback, a technique which may be promising tool to modulate cerebral plasticity in a safe, painless, and natural way."

Leer +

A pioneering collaboration between two laboratories from the University of London has provided the first evidence of neuroplastic changes occurring directly after natural brainwave training. Researchers from Goldsmiths and the Institute of Neurology have demonstrated that half an hour of voluntary control of brain rhythms is sufficient to induce a lasting shift in cortical excitability and intracortical function.

 

Remarkably, these after-effects are comparable in magnitude to those observed following interventions with artificial forms of brain stimulation involving magnetic or electrical pulses. The novel finding may have important implications for future non-pharmacological therapies of the brain and calls for a serious re-examination and stronger backing of research on neurofeedback, a technique which may be promising tool to modulate cerebral plasticity in a safe, painless, and natural way.

Doctors Preach "Brain Training" to Treat Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

by Sarah Lucero / KENS 5

There are a growing number of medical experts who say they have discovered a groundbreaking treatment that doesn't involve taking more pills or traditional approaches. It involves stimulating the brain in a way that's never been done before.

Leer +

Dr. Ron Swatzyna remembers Nov. 5, 2009, well. That day, Major Nidal Hassan opened fire at Fort Hood, killing 13 people and wounding dozens of others. But all Swatzyna could think about was what must have been going on inside Hassan's mind

 

I think it finally finally set him into a secondary PTSD, said Swatzyna, referring to the post-traumatic stress disorder likely brought about during Hassan's military service. He had no defense mechanisms to calm himself. And he had issues with anger.

 

Incidents like that one in Killeen, Texas, have driven the Houston-based doctor and a growing number of specialists around the country to find a treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder that works.

EEG Neurofeedback for Treating Psychiatric Disorders

 

Neurofeedback, also called electroencephalogram (EEG) biofeedback or neurotherapy, is an adjunctive treatment used for psychiatric conditions such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, phobic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, bipolar disorder, depression and affective disorders, autism, and addictive disorders (Moore, 2000; Rosenfeld, 2000; Trudeau, 2000).

 

Neurofeedback: An ADHD Treatment That Retrains the Brain?

 

U.S. News & World Report by Megan JohnsonSeptember 10, 2009

Neurofeedback, also called EEG biofeedback, has been under investigation as a treatment for epilepsy and ADHD since the 1970s. Putting it to use on children with attention deficits has logical appeal. Studies suggest that in ADHD, the brain generates insufficient beta waves, which are associated with focus and attention, and an overabundance of lower-frequency theta waves, produced during periods of daydreaming or drowsiness.

Neurofeedback Has Been Found to Improve Cognitive and Artistic Performance

 

By enabling individuals to self-regulate their brainwave activity in the field of optimal performance in healthy individuals, neurofeedback has been found to improve cognitive and artistic performance. Here we assessed whether two distinct EEG neurofeedback protocols could develop surgical skill, given the important role this skill plays in medicine.

Brain Training to Treat ADHD Symptoms

 

Source: ADDitude Magazine by Pamela Michaels, Maggie Jackson, Carl Sherman, Ph.D.

Learn how to treat ADHD symptoms with neurofeedback, working memory training, and meditation - alternatives to ADD medication for children and adults

Nuestros Aliados

 

Todos los derechos reservados ©2015 #HechoPorEcho

Powered by